Advertisement
Preclinical Studies
Subscribe to Preclinical Studies

The Lead

Common Bacteria on Verge of Becoming Antibiotic-Resistant Superbugs

March 26, 2015 1:29 pm | by Michael C. Purdy, Washington Univ. | News | Comments

Antibiotic resistance is poised to spread globally among bacteria frequently implicated in respiratory and urinary infections in hospital settings, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Read more...

FDA Approves Anthrax Treatment

March 25, 2015 1:10 pm | by Stephanie Guzowski, Editor | News | Comments

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) yesterday approved Emergent BioSolutions’ infusible drug ...

Nanotechnology Platform Shows Promise for Treating Pancreatic Cancer

March 24, 2015 12:48 pm | by UCLA | News | Comments

Scientists at UCLA’s California NanoSystems Institute and Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center...

New Hope for Beating Deadly Hereditary Stomach and Breast Cancers

March 20, 2015 10:11 am | by University of Otago | News | Comments

Deadly familial stomach and lobular breast cancers could be successfully treated at their...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Daily news and top headlines for drug research professionals

Capturing the Living Picture of Cancer: Proteomic Testing in the Clinical Lab

March 19, 2015 12:46 pm | by Richard Hockett, M.D., Chief Medical Officer at Biodesix, a molecular diagnostics company | Articles | Comments

If genetic sequencing provides the script of life, then proteomics is the live video capturing biology in action. Proteomics moves beyond the static information provided by genomics and tells the story in real-time of proteins, which result from the individual genes within a cell. Read more...

Potential Treatment for Most Common Form of Muscular Dystrophy

March 17, 2015 12:02 pm | by University of Virginia Health System | News | Comments

A doctor who was one of the discoverers of the gene responsible for myotonic muscular dystrophy has now identified a therapeutic that could slow progression of muscle damage and muscle dysfunction associated with the disease – issues that cause patients significant disability and deterioration in quality of life. Read more...

GSK Announces Start of Phase 3 Program for Retosiban Evaluation

March 17, 2015 8:46 am | News | Comments

Retosiban is an investigational oxytocin antagonist. Read more...

Advertisement

Researchers Unlock the Mysteries of Wound Healing

March 16, 2015 11:49 am | by Jill Goetz, UA News | News | Comments

A multidisciplinary research team discovers how cells know to rush to a wound and heal it – opening the door to new treatments for diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Researchers at the University of Arizona have discovered what causes and regulates collective cell migration, one of the most universal but least understood biological processes in all living organisms. Read more...

Anti-Herpes Drug May Help Control HIV

March 13, 2015 1:56 pm | by Stephanie Guzowski, Editor | News | Comments

A drug that’s used to control herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) could reduce levels of HIV in patients who do not have genital herpes, finds a National Institutes of Health (NIH) study. Read more...

Stem Cells Lurking in Tumors Can Resist Treatment

March 13, 2015 11:35 am | by Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Scientists are eager to make use of stem cells’ extraordinary power to transform into nearly any kind of cell, but that ability also is cause for concern in cancer treatment. Malignant tumors contain stem cells, prompting worries among medical experts that the cells’ transformative powers help cancers escape treatment. Read more...

Skin Tumors Develop Specific Mutations to Resist Drug, Researchers Say

March 11, 2015 10:51 am | by Krista Conger, Stanford University | News | Comments

Basal cell carcinomas develop mutations in a protein on the Hedgehog pathway to evade a common drug therapy. Targeting another portion of the pathway may be an effective alternative treatment. Read more...                     

Takeda Announces Transfer of License Agreement for HPV Vaccine to Kaketsuken

March 11, 2015 8:38 am | News | Comments

Kaketsuken will continue research efforts to support future commercialization of this vaccine. Read more...                         

Advertisement

Scientists Open Door for HIV Drug

March 10, 2015 1:06 pm | News | Comments

Salk scientists have gotten one step closer to creating such a drug by customizing a powerful defense system used by many bacteria and training this scissor-like machinery to recognize the HIV virus. Read more...

Innovative Light Therapy Reaches Tumors

March 9, 2015 4:53 pm | by Julia Evangelou Strait, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Light long has been used to treat cancer. Read more...                                  

Tiny Nanoparticles Could Make Impact for Cornea Transplant Patients

March 9, 2015 10:13 am | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

Animal study shows that a nanoparticle applied at the time of surgery slowly releases needed medicine to reduce risk of rejection after eye surgery. Read more...                                

Stem Cell Researchers Develop Method to Treat Sickle Cell Disease

March 9, 2015 9:55 am | by UCLA | News | Comments

UCLA stem cell researchers have shown that a novel stem cell gene therapy method could lead to a one-time, lasting treatment for sickle cell disease—the nation's most common inherited blood disorder. Read more...

A New Stem Cell Advance

March 3, 2015 12:03 pm | by Hannah Robbins, Harvard | News | Comments

Collaborating with scientists from New York, Toronto, and Tokyo, Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) researchers have devised two methods for using stem cells to generate the type of neurons that help regulate behavioral and basic physiological functions in the human body, such as obesity and hypertension, as well as sleep, mood, and some social disorders. Read more...

Advertisement

New Target Identified in Fight Against Alzheimer's, Multiple Sclerosis

March 2, 2015 10:15 am | News | Comments

Highlighting a potential target in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests that triggering a protein found on the surface of brain cells may help slow the progression of these and other neurological diseases.

How An FDA-Approved Drug Boosts Myelin Synthesis

March 2, 2015 10:11 am | News | Comments

Damage to myelin, the fatty insulator that enables communication between nerve cells, characterizes multiple sclerosis (MS) and other devastating neurological diseases. Read more...

New Understanding of Alzheimer’s

February 26, 2015 11:25 am | by Peter Reuell, Harvard | News | Comments

Although natural selection is often thought of as a force that determines the adaptation of replicating organisms to their environment, Harvard researchers have found that selection also occurs at the level of neurons, which are post-mitotic cells, and plays a critical role in the emergence of Alzheimer’s disease. Read more...

Hair Cells From Stem Cells

February 25, 2015 10:23 am | by Drug Discovery & Development Staff | Articles | Comments

In a research area that will generate blockbuster profits if/when it pans out, a science team reported creating new hair cells from pluripotent stem cells in a recent issue of PLOS (Proceedings of the Library of Science) One. Read more..

Small Molecule May Help Reduce Cancer in At-Risk Population

February 25, 2015 9:51 am | by Kimberless D'Ardenne, Stanford University | News | Comments

Scientists have shown that small molecules can “hijack” enzyme function in mice, suggesting a possible preventive mechanism for alcohol-related cancers in an at-risk population. Read more...

Obesity-Type 2 Diabetes Molecular Link Reveals Potential Therapy

February 23, 2015 4:49 pm | News | Comments

Obesity causes inflammation, which can in turn lead to type 2 diabetes. What isn’t well established is how inflammation causes diabetes — or what we can do to stop it. Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered that the inflammatory molecule LTB4 promotes insulin resistance, a first step in developing type 2 diabetes. Read more..

Customized DNA Rings Aid Early Cancer Detection in Mice

February 23, 2015 4:43 pm | by Bruce Goldman, Stanford | News | Comments

Imagine: You pop a pill into your mouth and swallow it. It dissolves, releasing tiny particles that are absorbed and cause only cancerous cells to secrete a specific protein into your bloodstream. Two days from now, a finger-prick blood sample will expose whether you’ve got cancer and even give a rough idea of its extent. Read more...

The Next Generation of Antibiotics Might Be Right Under Our Feet

February 23, 2015 10:21 am | News | Comments

The discovery of a new antibiotic called teixobactin was announced by international team of researchers, in January this year. It is the most significant new antibiotic to be discovered in more than 30 years, and it may help combat the growing number of drug-resistant bacteria. Read more...

The Journey to an HIV Vaccine Endures

February 19, 2015 12:46 pm | by Stephanie Guzowski, Editor | Articles | Comments

Despite more than 30 years of efforts, scientists have not yet come up with a reliably effective HIV vaccine — in part, because of the inherently complicated nature of the virus. Here are where their research efforts stand today.

Tadpole Model Links Drug Exposure to Autism-Like Effects

February 18, 2015 10:31 am | by Brown University | News | Comments

Research suggests that fetal exposure to chemicals or drugs can cause neurological problems. Babies whose mothers take the epilepsy drug valporic acid (VPA) during pregnancy, for example, appear to have an elevated risk of developing an autism spectrum disorder. Read more...

Taking Technology from the Lab to the Patient

February 18, 2015 10:17 am | by MIT | News | Comments

After finishing his PhD in molecular genetics in the late 1990s, Daniel Anderson found himself conflicted about what to do next: He enjoyed science, but wanted to find a way to have a direct impact on human health. Read more...

Link Between Genetic Switch, Autoimmune Diseases

February 17, 2015 12:53 pm | by NIH | News | Comments

Investigators with the National Institutes of Health have discovered the genomic switches of a blood cell key to regulating the human immune system. The findings, published in Nature, open the door to new research and development in drugs and personalized medicine to help those with autoimmune disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease or rheumatoid arthritis. Read more...

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading